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Understanding The Difference: Ham Radio- GMRS- CB- MURS- FRS

JamesRoss
JamesRoss - 169 Views
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169 Views
Published on 08 Jan 2023 / In Technology

Randy from NotARubicon Youtube Channel explains the meaning of public radio users.
"SHIT HIT THE FAN" EMERGENCY = Brainchip-Zombies Roaming Your Streets

What to program into your Baofeng... (for listening only) brush-up on your analog wireless tools.

FRS: https://www.fcc.gov/wireless/bureau-divisions/mobility-division/family-radio-service-frs
Channel No. Frequency Power (ERP in Watts)
1 462.5625 2 W
2 462.5875 2 W
3 462.6125 2 W
4 462.6375 2 W
5 462.6625 2 W
6 462.6875 2 W
7 462.7125 2 W
8 467.5625 0.5 W
9 467.5875 0.5 W
10 467.6125 0.5 W
11 467.6375 0.5 W
12 467.6625 0.5 W
13 467.6875 0.5 W
14 467.7125 0.5 W
15 462.5500 2 W
16 462.5750 2 W
17 462.6000 2 W
18 462.6250 2 W
19 462.6500 2 W
20 462.6750 2 W
21 462.7000 2 W
22 462.7250 2 W

Citizen Band(CB) Frequencies:
https://www.wearecb.com/cb-radio-frequencies-channels.html
CB Frequency CB Channel Customary Use
26.96500 CB Channel 01 open to all
26.97500 CB Channel 02 open to all
26.98500 CB Channel 03 open to all
27.00500 CB Channel 04 open to all--4x4 channel
27.01500 CB Channel 05 open to all
27.02500 CB Channel 06 open to all
27.03500 CB Channel 07 open to all
27.05500 CB Channel 08 open to all
27.06500 CB Channel 09 Emergency
27.07500 CB Channel 10 open to all--regional roads
27.08500 CB Channel 11 open to all
27.10500 CB Channel 12 open to all
27.11500 CB Channel 13 open to all--marine, RV
27.12500 CB Channel 14 open to all--walkie talkies
27.13500 CB Channel 15 open to all
27.15500 CB Channel 16 open to all (also SSB)
27.16500 CB Channel 17 open to all--North/South Traffic
27.17500 CB Channel 18 open to all
27.18500 CB Channel 19 Truckers--East/West Hwy Traffic
27.20500 CB Channel 20 open to all
27.21500 CB Channel 21 open to all--regional roads
27.22500 CB Channel 22 open to all
27.25500 CB Channel 23 open to all
27.23500 CB Channel 24 open to all
27.24500 CB Channel 25 open to all
27.26500 CB Channel 26 open to all
27.27500 CB Channel 27 open to all
27.28500 CB Channel 28 open to all
27.29500 CB Channel 29 open to all
27.30500 CB Channel 30 open to all
27.31500 CB Channel 31 open to all
27.32500 CB Channel 32 open to all
27.33500 CB Channel 33 open to all
27.34500 CB Channel 34 open to all
27.35500 CB Channel 35 open to all
27.36500 CB Channel 36 open to all (also SSB)
27.37500 CB Channel 37 open to all (also SSB)
27.38500 CB Channel 38 open to all (also SSB, LSB)
27.39500 CB Channel 39 open to all (also SSB)
27.40500 CB Channel 40 open to all (also SSB)

Any authorized CB radio frequency is open to all, but some have agreed-upon special purposes. For instance, channel 9 is for emergency use, and channel 19 is used by truckers to report on traffic conditions. Channel 19 is at the middle of the bands, thus has the best antenna efficiency. Channel 9 is used less often for emergencies since the advent of cell phones, but some rural communities still monitor that channel for emergencies. Those who want information or wish to contribute appropriate information on specialized channels are welcomed, as are listeners.

Listening is an important step for beginners, especially on channel 19. Truckers have their own handles (names) and jargon, and many do not welcome non-truckers on the channel. One way to make yourself unwelcome is to misuse or overuse the jargon, or slang. Either one marks you as an outsider and may be used to justify bullying you off the channel. If you want to get a head start on understanding truckers' slang, that's covered in another section.


There are 30 GMRS channels with a bandwidth of 25 kHz (20 KHz authorized bandwidth) or 12.5 kHz as outlined below:
https://www.fcc.gov/wireless/bureau-divisions/mobility-division/general-mobile-radio-service-gmrs 
Channel Authorized Bandwidth
462.5500 20 kHz
462.5625 20 kHz
462.5750 20 kHz
462.5875 20 kHz
462.6000 20 kHz
462.6125 20 kHz
462.6250 20 kHz
462.6375 20 kHz
462.6500 20 kHz
462.6625 20 kHz
462.6750 20 kHz
462.6875 20 kHz
462.7000 20 kHz
462.7125 20 kHz
462.7250 20 kHz
 
467.5500 20 kHz
467.5625 12.5 kHz
467.5750 20 kHz
467.6125 12.5 kHz
467.6000 20 kHz
467.6625 12.5 kHz
467.6250 20 kHz
467.7125 12.5 kHz
467.6500 20 kHz
467.5875 12.5 kHz
467.6750 20 kHz
467.6375 12.5 kHz
467.7000 20 kHz
467.6875 12.5 kHz
467.7250 20 kHz

There are five MURS channels and the channels are either 11.25 kHz or 20.00 kHz each. The channel frequencies and (bandwidth) are:
https://www.fcc.gov/wireless/bureau-divisions/mobility-division/multi-use-radio-service-murs
151.820 MHz (11.25 kHz)                                
151.880 MHz (11.25 kHz)                                
151.940 MHz (11.25 kHz)                                
154.570 MHz (20.00 kHz)                                
154.600 MHz (20.00 kHz)      

HAM RADIO FREQUENCIES
https://fieldradio.org/ham-radio-frequencies-to-listen-to/

https://www.ntia.doc.gov/legacy/osmhome/alloctbl/allockhz.html
https://www.ntia.doc.gov/legacy/osmhome/alloctbl/allocmhz.html

As far as Ham radio nets are concerned, ARRL has an extensive database of all registered Ham radio nets on their website. You can visit www.arrl.org/arrl-net-directory-search and search for your required net easily.

It’s also worth noting that, as you have the ability to tune into any frequency with your gear, you could even listen in to CB or GMRS frequencies with your ham radio.
Final Word

When you jump into the Ham radio world, it’s usually with a purpose.

You either want to practice it as a hobby or rely on the communication medium to keep you connected during emergencies.

The purpose you use your Ham radio for can largely define the right Ham radio frequencies to listen to for you.

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