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Origins of Human Subspecies DNA Differ Most Likely From Ancient A.i. Used by Homo Capensis Before the Ice Age

JamesRoss
JamesRoss - 361 Views
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361 Views
Published on 16 Jan 2022 / In Entertainment

Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ueVspcacrM
(Note: Anything the Freemasons have to say as archeologist has to be taken with a grain of salt and use your own critical thinking abilities... the following is what they write...)

"Scientists have sequenced a 37,000-year-old European genome. The results show that present-day Europeans are the closest living relatives to the first people in Europe. The genome also indicates that many European traits, including those from the Middle East, were already present in the first Europeans. The study, which was recently published in Science, sheds entirely new light on who we are as Europeans, which was originally a separate species from African lineages.

"It turns out that Scandinavians, Balts and Slavs are more closely related to the Kostenki man than any other now-living population. This means that northern Europeans are the earliest Europeans.
Scientists have sequenced a 37,000-year-old genome. The results show that present-day Europeans are the closest living relatives to the first people in Europe.
An international team of scientists have sequenced the genome of a 37,000-year-old male skeleton found in Kostenki in Russia.

"The study, which was recently published in Science, sheds entirely new light on who we are as Europeans. "From a genetic point of view he's an European," says Professor Eske Willerslev, Director of the Centre for GeoGenetics at the University of Copenhagen, who was involved in the new study, and adds:

“Actually, he is closer to Danes, Swedes, Finns and Russians than to Frenchmen, Spaniards and Germans”.
Split happened within a 8.000 year gap

The new results reveal that the man is the oldest that we know of so far to genetically represent a separate line from the forebears of present-day Asians. This is decisive when it comes to dating one of the most important events in history.

"We can now date the separation time between Asians and Europeans."

"He points out that the Kostenki genome sets a line 37,000 years ago. Here the lines must have split, while the 45,000-year-old genome from the recently discovered Ust' Ishim in Siberia sets the limit in the other direction.

This gives the answer to one of the biggest questions in the history of mankind; scientists now know that it is within the 8000 year gap that Europeans and Asians went their separate ways.
Meta-population: sex across populations

Previously the impression was that our forebears lived in separate populations and had children within the group, instead, Willerslev now paints a very different picture consisting of one large meta-population.

A meta-population consists of several populations which mate with each other.

The meta-population is connected through the neighbour's neighbours, consisting of people who generally resemble each other a lot, but who also have their own unique traits.

"It was a huge, complex network, and not separate branches that lived in isolation,” says Willerslev.

He believes the Europeans must have been one enormous meta-population stretching across Europe, the Middle East and Central Asia.

An international team of scientists have sequenced the genome of a 37,000-year-old male skeleton found in Kostenki in Russia.

The study, which was recently published in Science, sheds entirely new light on who we are as Europeans.

"From a genetic point of view he's an European," says Professor Eske Willerslev, Director of the Centre for GeoGenetics at the University of Copenhagen, who was involved in the new study, and adds:
“Actually, he is closer to Danes, Swedes, Finns and Russians than to Frenchmen, Spaniards and Germans”.
Split happened within a 8.000 year gap

The new results reveal that the man is the oldest that we know of so far to genetically represent a separate line from the forebears of present-day Asians. This is decisive when it comes to dating one of the most important events in history.
"We can now date the separation time between Asians and Europeans," says Professor Rasmus Nielsen from the University of Copenhagen and the University of California, Berkeley, who was also involved in the study.

He points out that the Kostenki genome sets a line 37,000 years ago. Here the lines must have split, while the 45,000-year-old genome from the recently discovered Ust' Ishim in Siberia sets the limit in the other direction.

"This gives the answer to one of the biggest questions in the history of mankind; scientists now know that it is within the 8000 year gap that Europeans and Asians went their separate ways.
Meta-population: sex across populations


"He believes the Europeans must have been one enormous meta-population stretching across Europe, the Middle East and Central Asia. It is possible to follow the genetic trail; all the way from the Kostenki genome, to hunter-gatherers in Siberia 25,000 years ago and farmers 7-8000 years ago in Spain, Luxembourg and Sweden, up to present-day Europeans.

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JamesRoss
JamesRoss 4 months ago

Just look at the eye sockets of this skull, then put your fingers to the to the bones of your own eye sockets. You see this is a hybird closer to the homo capensis blood. Some religious advocates don't like alternate variations of history fed to them by the Homo capensis, satan-race.
The Lumanians used A.i. before the ice age destruction that followed the capture of Earth towards the Sun's pull... a very destructive time to live through... all the various sub-species of humanity were distributed by their technology which was still in full force. The only thing we still have of the Lumanian civilization is the ancient stonework and the Remnant-Lumanians who still hide-out deep within the Earth's crust. https://ugetube.com/watch/anci....ent-reincarnational-

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